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2016 Hurricane Matthew – CDC International Response

Photo of a house completely destroyed by Hurricane Matthew in Moron in the Grand’Anse department of Haiti

Home in Moron, Haiti completely destroyed during Hurricane Matthew
Photo courtesy of Coralie Giese, CDC Global Rapid Response Team

Background

Category 4 Hurricane Matthew struck the south-west coast of Haiti at 0700 local time (1200 GMT) on 4 October. Wind speeds of 230km/h were recorded, causing widespread damage, flooding and displacement. The most affected departments are Grand Anse, South, Nippes and South East, where heavy floods were recorded. West and North West departments were also affected. The government of Haiti has issued a Red Alert and the Haiti National Emergency Operation Center has been activated. Estimates are that over 2 million people could be affected.

What is CDC doing?

CDC’s Emergency Response and Recovery Branch is leading efforts to support countries impacted by Hurricane Matthew. This includes coordinating with the US Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), the CDC Haiti Country Office, and other governmental and humanitarian partners to support response efforts. CDC’s country office in Haiti and teams of public health responders from Atlanta are focusing their efforts on assessing the public health impact of the storm and working with our Haitian partners to repair damaged public health systems. CDC health experts are in Haiti to assess the impact of the storm on health needs and infrastructure.

Current health priorities for the CDC Haiti country office are to ensure that those affected continue to receive health care; to collect data on cholera and other diseases that are prone to outbreaks, and to evaluate the interruption of safe water and sanitation supplies.
Hurricane Matthew and Haiti: Putting CDC Expertise to Work

What you can do

After a hurricane, you may face flooding, downed power lines, damage from mold, and other risks to your health. Get tips on how to recover safely from a hurricane. USAID’s Center for International Disaster Information provides information on the most effective ways to support international disaster relief and recovery.

Updates from governmental and humanitarian partners

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