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2010 Report: Public Health Preparedness

Section 1: A National Snapshot of Public Health Preparedness Activities - Continued

Additional CDC Resources Supporting Preparedness in States and Localities

CDC supports a variety of other programs and resources in the states and localities to enhance preparedness. These activities are described below and summarized in Table 9.

Research, Training, Education, and Promising Demonstration Projects

Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP). The CPHP program strengthens preparedness by linking academic expertise to state and local health agency needs. This program is an important resource for the development, delivery, and evaluation of preparedness education. CPHPs collaborate with state and other health agencies to develop, deliver, and evaluate preparedness education based on community need. In FY 2008, 28 colleges and universities within the CPHP program provided preparedness education to public health workers, healthcare providers, and students.

Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRC). PERRCs conduct research to evaluate the structure, capabilities, and performance of preparedness and emergency response activities in federal, state, and local public health systems. PERRC scientists must connect with multiple partners within the public health infrastructure to incorporate diverse perspectives into their research. In FY 2008, CDC awarded funding to seven accredited schools of public health for establishing PERRCs.44

Advanced Practice Centers (APC). This network of local health departments develops resources and training that enhance the capabilities of all local health departments and the public health system to prepare for, respond to, and recover from public health emergencies. In FY 2008, there were seven APCs nationwide.


Centers for Public Health Preparedness Respond to the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

Centers for Public Health Preparedness Respond
to the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic
Academic-based Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHPs) provide learning opportunities to the public health workforce to strengthen their capabilities for responding to a crisis. During the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, CPHPs provided subject matter expertise as well as training and technical assistance, and even helped enhance the state and local workforce capacity.

  • Faculty from several CPHPs were called upon to advise college and university campuses on the 2009 H1N1 influenza response, provide counsel on risk communication efforts in disadvantaged populations, and conduct numerous interviews with television, radio, web-based, and print media.
  • CPHPs developed free 2009 H1N1 influenza trainings for the public health workforce, and advised state and local health departments on continuity of operations planning and point-of-distribution site operations for flu vaccines.
  • Graduate students across the country volunteered their services to staff information hotlines and help investigate possible cases.

Source: Association of Schools of Public Health, H1N1 Report: Centers for Public Health (2009)


Centers of Excellence in Public Health Informatics. These Centers contribute to the efforts of CDC’s Public Health Informatics program by advancing the ability of healthcare professionals to communicate health recommendations to consumers, and by making the use of electronic information systems easier. They seek to improve the public’s health through discovery, innovation, and research related to health information and information technology. In FY 2008, there were five Centers.

Pandemic Influenza Promising Practices Demonstration Projects. In FY 2008, selected state and local public health departments received Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) cooperative agreement pandemic influenza supplemental funding through a competitive process for 55 projects serving as innovative approaches for pandemic influenza preparedness. The goal was to develop promising practices or effective approaches that can be replicated nationally to improve national, regional, and local public health detection and response to an influenza pandemic.


CDC’s Public Health Advisors and Career Epidemiology Field Officers Facilitate Preparedness Activities at State and Local Levels


Since 2002, CDC has placed public health advisors (PHAs) and Career Epidemiology Field Officers (CEFOs) in state and local health departments. (States use PHEP funds to support CEFO positions.) PHAs serve as liaisons for CDC and provide on-site program technical assistance, guidance, and coordination. Examples of their activities include building epidemiologic capacity; building partnerships with other agencies and stakeholders; leading or participating in state and/or local emergency response exercises; supporting planning and response for preparedness activities, including pandemic influenza; and providing substantive and strategic program advice and assistance.

Source: CDC, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response


Other CDC Resources Available to States and Localities

Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Field Officers. The EIS program expands the epidemiology workforce through a two-year epidemiology training program modeled on a traditional medical fellowship. EIS officers (epidemiologists) serve as a critical component to CDC’s support of states and localities during responses to routine public health incidents and large-scale national emergencies. In FY 2008, 71 officers were assigned to state and local public health departments, where they conducted 319 epidemiologic investigations (e.g., public health response, research, and surveillance system evaluations) and functioned as an integral part of the health department.

Deployments of CDC staff to states. CDC personnel are deployed routinely for emergency response operations and EPI-AID investigations. For EPI-AID investigations, CDC’s EIS officers, along with other CDC staff, provide technical support to state health agencies requesting assistance for epidemiologic field investigations of disease outbreaks or other health emergencies. In FY 2008, there were 84 incidents with a total of 381 CDC staff deployed.

Table 9: Additional CDC Projects and Activites Enhancing Preparedness in States and Localities; 2008

Research, Training, Education, and Promising Demonstration Projects Number
Centers for Public Health Preparedness CDC, OPHPR (OD); FY 2008 28
Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers CDC, OPHPR (OD); FY 2008 7
Advanced Practice Centers NACCHO; FY 2008 7
Centers of Excellence in Public Health Informatics CDC, OSELS; FY 2008 5
Pandemic Influenza Promising Practices Demonstration Projects CDC, OPHPR (DSLR); FY 2008 55
Additional CDC Resources Supporting Preparedness in States and Localities Number
Epidemic Intelligence Service CDC, OSELS; FY 2008
  • Epidemic Intelligence Service Field Officers
  • Investigations conducted by Epidemic Intelligence Service Field Officers

71

319
Deployments CDC, OPHPR (DEO); FY 2008
  • Total number of incidents with deployments
  • Total number of CDC staff deployed

84

381
Career Epidemiology Field Officers CDC, OPHPR (OD); as of 9/30/2008 26*
Quarantine Stations CDC, OID (NCEZID); FY 2008 19**

*One additional CEFO is located in American Samoa
**One additional quarantine station is located in Puerto Rico

Career Epidemiology Field Officers (CEFOs). CDC places experienced, full-time epidemiologists in state and local public health departments to enhance and build epidemiologic capacity for public health preparedness and response. (States use PHEP funds to support CEFO positions.) CEFOs also serve as liaisons and consultants between CDC and public health departments, and as mentors for state and local public health department staff and EIS officers assigned to state or local health departments. In FY 2008, 26 CEFOs were located in 21 states and one CEFO was located in American Samoa.

Quarantine Stations. In FY 2008, CDC’s 19 domestic quarantine stations (one additional quarantine station is located in Puerto Rico), strategically located at U.S. ports of entry where the majority of international travelers arrive in the United States, helped detect and respond to diseases of public health significance.


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